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  • Pertaining to the global forces that cause folding and faulting of the Earth's crust. Also used to classify or describe features or structures formed by the action of those forces.
  • The branch of geology dealing with the broad architecture of the upper (outer) part of Earth; that is, the major structural or deformational features, their origins, historical evolution, and relations to each other. It is similar to structural geology, but generally deals with larger features such as whole mountain ranges, or continents.
  • A borehole log, run only in water-filled boreholes, that measures the water temperature and the quality of groundwater in the well.
  • An abandoned flood plain formed when a stream flowed at a level above the level of its present channel and flood plain.
  • Sediment eroded from the land, or a continent, and deposited in water (generally in a marine environment).
  • Unconsolidated, nonsorted, unstratified drift deposited by and underneath a glacier and consisting of a heterogenous mixture of different sizes and kinds of rock fragments.
  • The undulating surface of low relief in the area underlain by ground moraine.
  • The natural or physical surface features of a region, considered collectively as to form; the features revealed by the contour lines of a map.
  • The first period of the Mesozoic era (after the Permian of the Paleozoic era, and before the Jurassic), thought to have covered the span of time between 225 and 190 million years ago; also, the corresponding system of rocks. The Triassic is so named because of its threefold division in the rocks of Germany. Syn: Trias.
  • In cases where till has been indurated or lithified by subsequent burial into solid rock, it is known as the sedimentary rock tillite.